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NYTimes: Code Name: Mainstream (Can Open Source Bridge the Software Gap?)

NYTimes: Code Name: Mainstream (Can Open Source Bridge the Software Gap?)


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"'Open source software' seems a radical approach indeed. The term stands for both an iconoclastic philosophy and a software development model: software is distributed free and its 'source code,' or underlying instructions, are published openly so that other programmers can study, share and modify the author's work." But open source, once viewed as an ideological movement at the fringes of computing, is moving into the mainstream -- largely because the spread of the Internet and personal computers make it easy for programmers to collaborate in far-flung, voluntary teams.

"The open-source model represents a sharp break with the practices of the commercial software business, which considers source code a company's private property -- usually guarded jealously and shared only rarely, under strict licensing terms."

"But open source, once viewed as an ideological movement at the fringes of computing, is moving into the mainstream -- largely because the spread of the Internet and personal computers make it easy for programmers to collaborate in far-flung, voluntary teams."

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This article was originally published on Aug 28, 2000
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