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Embotics Takes Command of Private Cloud Servers

By ServerWatch Staff (Send Email)
Posted Jun 10, 2011


Managing private cloud deployments is big business. Virtualization is supposed to help enterprise consolidate server sprawl and realize operational efficiencies, but it requires the proper management infrastructure. V-Commander 4.0 software enables the development of self-service catalogs and rapid virtual machine provisioning.

Software vendor Embotics is aiming to deliver on the promise of private cloud virtualization management with its new V-Commander 4.0 release. The new release is targeted at the midmarket for enterprises with between 250 and 2,000 servers. It delivers new provisioning and service automation features.

"It's Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and we also integrate virtualization management capabilities," Jay Litkey, CEO, president and founder of Embotics told InternetNews.com. "Traditionally, people look at IaaS vendors that are just focused on the provisioning of virtual machines, we have all of that and have included the same product real-time monitoring and virtualization management."

The V-Commander 4.0 release includes a new service catalog, approval workflow and rapid provisioning capabilities.

Litkey explained that the approval workflow component enables an enterprise to have a system whereby administrators approve which users get access to virtual machine assets. The system also tracks the workflow of a service request, so both users and administrators can monitor status.

The service catalog is built by the organization using a drag and drop form builder. Litkey explained that many companies make available a template of approved services. He added that the service catalog portal can also be used to request changes to an existing service. The rapid provisioning component comes into plays once the service catalog item workflow request has been approved.

The V-Commander software can run on either a virtual or physical appliance. Currently, Embotics does not offer the product in a hosted Software-as-a-Service cloud model.

"We don't do that today, it's a conceptual type of deployment, and we haven't seen strong demand for it," Litkey said. "Clearly, as the world evolves and the world moves to more cloud driven approaches, you can expect that we'll see an uptick in more people asking for it."

Litkey explained that in his view, most enterprise still feel more comfortable having automated management software deployed on-premise.

"People want to first be comfortable with automation within the walls of their own private cloud first," Litkey said.

V-Commander is also currently limited to management of on-premise private clouds as well, instead of some form of hybrid deployment that includes public cloud components. Moving forward, Litkey hinted that could change as the product evolves.

In the future, Litkey sees continued innovation for V-Commander in a number of areas.

"Since we have monitoring of capacity and the automation for creation and destruction of virtual machines, we'll have more investment to tie that information together to make intelligent decisions," Litkey said.

Litkey noted that in V-Commander 4.0, there is an intelligent placement feature that determines where a new VM should be provisioned. With an improved tie in to monitoring, that placement feature can be enhanced with historical and compliance data.

"In 4.0 we started the process and we have more planned in terms of tying this knowledge together to do provisioning in an intelligent, automated fashion," Litkey said.

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of Internet.com, the network for technology professionals.

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