GuidesServerWatch News Briefs for December 5, 2003

ServerWatch News Briefs for December 5, 2003




This Week’s Swatches

  • IBM, SUSE Linux Establish Software Integration Center
  • GFI Release Network Server Monitor
  • SWsoft Launches New Partner Program
  • IBM, SUSE Linux Establish Software Integration Center

    IBM and SUSE join forces to bring optimized middleware to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server; SWsoft beefs up its partner program and makes it more user friendly; and GFI unveils GFI Network Server Monitor, a tool that monitors network and servers for failures and allows administrators to identify and fix issues before users report them.

    SUSE Linux and IBM Thursday announced they had jointly established a Software Integration Center within IBM’s Toronto Lab.

    The partnership seeks to fine-tune interaction between SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and IBM Middleware offerings. The collaboration will initially focus on IBM DB2 Universal Database offerings. Plans for extension to other IBM software products are already under way.

    In the Software Integration Center, IBM and SUSE will collaborate on porting, migration, certification, and support for future IBM DB2 software offerings on the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server platform. The goal is to optimize the functionality of database applications and underlying enterprise operating system technology.

    The companies believe the combination of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and IBM DB2 database software will equal a highly available, scalable combination for mission-critical deployments in data centers as well as specifically tuned middleware and certified updates that are available more quickly.

    “The SUSE-IBM Software Integration Center at the IBM Toronto Lab will intensify the work already under way to optimize DB2 and other IBM software products with SUSE Linux offerings,” said Bob Picciano, Director of Database Technology, IBM Toronto Software Lab. “The result will be solutions that can help provide customers with a rapid return on investment, particularly for IBM’s integrated Linux database cluster.”

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    GFI Release Network Server Monitor

    GFI Thursday released GFI Network Server Monitor, a tool that monitors network and servers for failures and allows administrators to identify and fix issues before users report them.

    Alerts of unexpected conditions can be sent by e-mail, pager or SMS, and GFI Network Server Monitor can automatically correct the problem by restarting a service (or multiple services) upon failure; rebooting a server; or launching an executable, batch job or VBScript.

    GFI believes its offering stands out because of its $695 price point and ease of use. It claims administrators can be up and running with network monitoring within an hour of installation.

    Among the things the monitoring tool checks out-of-the-box are:

    • Exchange Server 2000/2003 — Checks the status of an Exchange Server by monitoring critical Exchange services and performance counters
    • All popular database servers (SQL/ORACLE/ODBC) — Natively checks the availability of all leading database applications, including Microsoft SQL Server, and Oracle via OBDC
    • HTTP, FTP, SMTP, POP3, and IMAP servers — Checks for availability and ensures that the servers are responding correctly
    • Windows servers and workstations, UNIX/Linux and Novell — Monitors Windows, Unix/Linux and Novell platforms
    • Processes, services and CPU usage — Checks critical processes, services, and CPU usage on local and remote computers
    • Users, groups, and other Active Directory information — Monitors Active Directory information, such as group membership of the domain admins group, and the addition of new members; also checks user and computer accounts

    GFI Network Server Monitor also checks remote event logs, SNMP devices, and disks and files. Custom checks can be added by writing a VBscript (Windows) or a RSH shell script (Unix).

    GFI Network Server Monitor is priced at $695 for unlimited monitoring of all workstations and servers (independent of the
    number of processors) in a network; a five-server monitoring license is priced at $375.

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