GuidesLearn Windows XP Professional: Using the Disk Management Tool (Page 4) Page...

Learn Windows XP Professional: Using the Disk Management Tool (Page 4) Page 4




Operating system Storage types Partition styles
Basic volumes Dynamic simple, spanned, and
stripped volumes
MBR disks GPT disks

Windows XP Home Edition

YES

NO

YES

NO 

Windows XP Professional

YES

YES

YES

NO

Windows 2000 Server

YES

YES

YES

NO

Windows 2000 Advanced Server

YES

YES

YES

 NO 

Windows 2000 Datacenter Server

YES

YES

YES

 NO


Windows XP 64-Bit Edition

YES

YES

YES

YES

Dynamic
Disk Limitations

Just like
anything else, with certain advances there are certain
limitations and drawbacks.

  • Laptop Limitation.
    Dynamic disks are not supported on laptops,
    removable disks (such as Jaz or ORB drives), detachable
    disks that use Universal Serial Bus (USB) or IEEE 1394
    (FireWire) interfaces, or on drives connected to a shared
    SCSI bus. On laptops you do not even see the
    option to convert basic disks to dynamic within the Disk
    Management tool.
  • Multi-boot
    considerations
    . Dynamic volumes cannot be accessed by 
    MS-DOS,
    Windows 95,
    Windows 98,
    Windows Millennium Edition,
    Windows NT 4.0, or
    Windows XP Home Edition operating systems
    that are dual-booted with
    Windows XP Professional. If you want
    computers running these operating systems to be able to
    access the data, you need to store the data on basic
    volumes.
  • Extending Volumes.
    When basic volumes are converted to dynamic they may or
    may not have an entry in the partition table depending on
    whether that volume was a system or boot partition. If the
    volume that was converted was originally a system or boot
    partition it retains its old entry in the partition table.
    You can install
    Windows XP Professional on that volume;
    however, you will be unable to extend it. If the converted
    volume was not originally a system or boot volume, it will
    not have the old partition table entry. You won’t be able
    to install
    Windows XP Professional on the volume, but
    it will be possible to extend it.

    Volumes converted from
    partitions on
    Windows 2000 systems
    have an entry in the partition table. On
    Windows XP Professional systems, volumes
    converted from partitions do not have an entry in the
    partition table unless the partitions were originally
    system or boot partitions. You can see if a volume has an
    entry in the partition table by right-clicking the volume
    within the Disk Management tool. If the Extend Volume
    option is disabled, the volume has an old entry in the
    partition table.

 

That’s a
wrap for this week. Be sure to check back in next week for
the next article in this series.

In
the meantime, best of luck in your
studies and please feel free to contact me with any
questions on my column and remember,

“Absolute anonymity isn’t practical, or possible, in real
life or on the internet.”


Jason Zandri
[email protected]


www.2000trainers.com

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