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ISPworld: The Web Server First Aid Kit: Handy tools for when all hell breaks loose

ISPworld: The Web Server First Aid Kit: Handy tools for when all hell breaks loose

By ServerWatch Staff (Send Email)
Posted Mar 11, 2001


"The key here is that, unlike quantum mechanics or carburetors, everything that goes wrong on a Unix system happens for a clearly defined reason. While that reason may sometimes be freakish or undocumented, it's almost always one of a few fairly common issues."

With that in mind, let's take a look at the handy tools and the usual suspects - the top commands and tools to use, and common places to look that will at least shed a clue on most server problems. I'm going to use FreeBSD as the example system - but most other BSDs and Linux can use the same tools, even if they act slightly differently or are located in a different place in the file system." ... [E]verything that goes wrong on a Unix system happens for a clearly defined reason. While that reason may sometimes be freakish or undocumented, it's almost always one of a few fairly common issues. ... With that in mind, let's take a look at the handy tools and the usual suspects - the top commands and tools to use, and common places to look that will at least shed a clue on most server problems.

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