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Road To MCSE: The NT-CIP Certification or 'One's Born Every Minute'

By ServerWatch Staff (Send Email)
Posted Nov 7, 2000


Thomas Shinder

This week's rendition of "Road To MCSE" is inspired by something I read over at ExamNotes, a web site dedicated to helping MCSEs and aspiring MCSEs. For the full text of the article, click HERE.

This weeks rendition of 'Road To MCSE' is inspired by something I read over at ExamNotes, a web site dedicated to helping MCSEs and aspiring MCSEs. For the full text of the article, click HERE. The NT-CIP (NT Certified Independent Professional) is an alternative Windows NT 4.0 certification program that its founders, Lanop of New York City, propound will extend the life of the Windows NT 4.0 MCSE certification program. They imply at their web site that this new certification will carry the same imprimatur as the MCSE. New entrants into the field can test out and obtain the NT-CIP and existing MCSEs can be 'grandfathered' into the program by sending $30US to the company.

The NT-CIP (NT Certified Independent Professional) is an alternative Windows NT 4.0 certification program that its founders, Lanop of New York City, propound will extend the life of the Windows NT 4.0 MCSE certification program. They imply at their web site that this new certification will carry the same imprimatur as the MCSE. New entrants into the field can test out and obtain the NT-CIP and existing MCSEs can be "grandfathered" into the program by sending $30US to the company.

There are several issues and misconceptions brought up in the ExamNotes article that beg for clarification.

Microsoft Provided Virtually No Time to Prepare for the Upgrade

The announcement that the Windows NT 4.0 certification exams would retire was made in the last quarter of 1999. At the time of the announcement, students in MCSE track had at least 14 months to finish their Windows NT 4.0 studies. Even students entirely new to the field of networking and operating systems could have easily finished up their Windows NT 4.0 studies and started working on Windows 2000 in that period of time.

Training Centers Are Unable To Cope With Change

The author of the article goes on to say that the Training Centers were not able to cope with the changes required to begin the Windows 2000 training program. These training centers did not have the wherewithal and resources to upgrade hardware and software, or to provide training materials for students seeking to begin the Windows 2000 training program.

Give me a break. These training centers could easily have upgraded their facilities to support a Windows 2000 Training Program. The problem with the vast majority that I've had the pleasure to work with is that they played ostrich and hoped the whole thing would go away. Many of them just denied that this was going to be an issue and continue to offer the same Windows NT 4.0 based certification without a care about the expiration of the Windows NT 4.0 program.

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