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Road To MCSE: Is Online Training For You?

By ServerWatch Staff (Send Email)
Posted Nov 12, 2000


Thomas Shinder

You have a number of options if you're in the market for IT training, especially Windows 2000 training. Traditionally, the most popular option has been hands-on, in the classroom classes. This training option has been around since IT training began, and you could consider it the benchmark with which to compare other options.

You have a number of options if youre in the market for IT training, especially Windows 2000 training. Traditionally, the most popular option has been hands-on, in the classroom classes. This training option has been around since IT training began, and you could consider it the benchmark with which to compare other options.

One training option is gaining a lot of popularity. There is a growing trend for online courses, delivered over the Internet. Until relatively recently, online training wasn't feasible because of bandwidth limitations. Those speedy 28.8 Kbps modems could not keep up with even a nominal amount of graphical material, and forget about streaming audio and video. However, the bandwidth barrier is falling, and if you have even an ISDN modem/adapter (128 Kbps), then you're in good shape to give the online training alternative a try.

What Is Online Training?

That's a good question. The moniker "online training" actually encompasses a variety of training methods and technologies. Some online training providers create streaming video and audio, so that taking an online training class is like watching a videotaped lecture.

Other online training companies prefer to cater to people who do not have much bandwidth and therefore would not get much a lot out of live or taped video feeds. These companies use a lot of screen shots and instructional graphics to provide a rich learning environment. Because these centers can't fall back on the glitz of audio/video feeds, they spend more time making the graphical environment attractive and educational.

Another group of online training companies just take material from another vendor, such as Microsoft, and slap up the same material that is found in the print manuals. These companies add nothing else to the learning environment and try to maximize their profits by not adding any expenses outside of the licensing fees they pay to the company from which they obtained the training materials.

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