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'How To' Series (Part 3): Computer Management Console

By ServerWatch Staff (Send Email)
Posted Sep 16, 2001


Christopher Rice

          First of all, I'd like to extend a note of gratitude for all of the firemen and policemen who gave their lives for our country.  Being a New Yorker, the events of the last week have hit pretty hard for me personally.  It makes life tough to go back to any normal routine.  But, we must, so here goes.

First of all, I'd like to extend a note of gratitude for all of the firemen and policemen who gave their lives for our country. Being a New Yorker, the events of the last week have hit pretty hard for me personally. It makes life tough to go back to any normal routine. But, we must, so here goes. The next in my ongoing series of 'How To' articles will take a look at the Computer Management Console and the functionality contained therein.

          The next in my ongoing series of "How To" articles will take a look at the Computer Management Console and the functionality contained therein.  

          To begin with, I would like to make you familiar with the MMC, the Microsoft Management Console.  This is new technology that was released in the later SPs for NT 4 and the SE of 98.  Basically, this technology allows for Snap-Ins to be molded and controlled by a central person or persons.

          For example, if you were a member of my administration team and I wanted you to monitor Performance Monitor and the Event Viewers, I could create a snap-in that would allow for just those views and send it to you in an e-mail.  For more information on either Performance Monitor or Event Viewers, see the first two of my articles in this series at the following links:

http://www.serverwatch.com/tutorials/article.php/2178431

http://www.serverwatch.com/tutorials/article.php/2178481

          This is great technology, in my opinion, and MSFT has spread it across their product lines.  I don't think it ill be so prevalent later in life, but now you can see it in other products such as the SMS 2.0 product.

          One of the MMC's that we are provided with out of the box with Windows 2000 is the Computer Management Console.  If you go into the Administrative Tools icon in the Control Panel and select Computer Management, you will see the following:



          You will undoubtedly notice some overlay and repetition from the other tools that we have discussed.  Notice the Event Viewers and Performance Monitor are presented for access from this MMC as well.  Keep in mind that this MMC can be edited or a new one can be created that will leave those out (if you desire).  

        The most important functions here (aside from the Perf Mon and Event) are the Device Manager and the Disk Management function.  One could argue for the Users and Group, but this is not the place to be dealing with those on a large scale anyway, since you should be running AD, right?

          The first of these is the Device Manager, this tool allows you to manage all of the Devices that are running on or attached to this machine.  It looks like the following:



As you can see, there are plenty of options to get into here.  When you double click on any one of the specific devices, you will get another pop-up window that will allow you all new access and information for this device.  This will look like the following:



This window provides you with the mechanisms to view this information, troubleshoot the device, get information regarding the driver, update the driver, Enable or Disable the device, etc.  This is a great function to manage the hardware related to the machine that you ar eworking with.

          The next of the most important functions is the Disk Management folder display.  When you highlight this, it will take a few seconds to load your information, but will then present you with a display like the following:



From here you will be able to work with each of your partitions and get more information regarding how this was set up.  To get the options for editing your setup, right click on the partition that you want to work with and drop down to whatever function you want to perform.  For example, if you want to format a partition, select Format from the drop down menu, and you will be presented with a small information window like the following:



Here, you have the ability to make your changes.  There are other functions aside from Formatting that you will be able to do, but heed the warnings that are presented, as making changes here can effect the data that you have on your drives.

          This Console takes a bit of getting used to but is quite useful once you get the hang of it.  Feel free to mail me with any questions or ideas about future "How To" articles that might interest you.

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