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70-240 in 15 minutes a week: Software Distribution, Terminal Services, and IIS

By ServerWatch Staff (Send Email)
Posted Apr 30, 2001


by Dan DiNicolo
http://www.win2000trainer.com

Welcome to article number 11 in my 70-240 in 15 minutes a week series. This week's article covers Software Distribution, Terminal Services, and IIS. This includes a look at software installation via group policy, the basics of configuring terminal services, as well as an overview of setting up a web or FTP server using Windows 2000. This article again ties into the Server portion of the series. 

The material to be covered in this article includes:

- Software Installation and Maintenance via Group Policy
- Installing and Configuring Terminal Services
- Internet Information Services 


Software Installation and Maintenance via Group Policy

A Window 2000 environment running Active Directory provides the ability to use group policy to distribute software to users and computers. This allows for the distribution of software at the site, domain, and organizational unit levels (the 3 levels within Active Directory to which group policy can be applied). Note that software can only be distributed to client systems running Windows 2000.

In a group policy object, the distribution of software is handled as part of both the computer and user sections, as shown below:
Welcome to article number eleven in my 70-240 in 15 minutes a week series. This week's article covers Software Distribution, Terminal Services, and IIS. This includes a look at software installation via group policy, the basics of configuring terminal services, as well as an overview of setting up a web or FTP server using Windows 2000.

When distributing software, two options exist - assigning and publishing. Software can be assigned to both users and computers, but software can only be published to users. The difference between the distribution types is outlined below:

Assigning software to users: Doing this will distribute software to users, but will not actually install it on their system. When software is assigned to a user, it 'follows' them, or appears to be installed on every machine they log on to. In reality, only shortcuts appear on the programs menu. If they user clicks on the shortcut, then the application is actually installed on that system. Assigning software to users gives that user access to the applications they need, even if the system doesnt have the software already installed.

Assigning software to computers: This method actually installs the software assigned to the computer the next time the system is restarted, making it available to all users of the system.

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