OpenLinux 2.2 -- New graphical interface eases installation and configuration

By ServerWatch Staff (Send Email)
Posted Jun 25, 2002


With OpenLinux 2.2, Caldera Systems makes Linux easier to install and monitor, thanks to the inclusion of several graphical utilities that guide you through the Linux experience from installation to ongoing maintenance. While these tools are important, they're not enough to hide the fact that OpenLinux doesn't offer anything different from other Linux distributions when it comes to setting up and running an Internet server.

Most of what's new and noteworthy in OpenLinux 2.2 isn't of great use when setting it up as an Internet platform: including StarOffice and Corel WordPerfect 8 is nice for end users running OpenLinux on the desktop, but they're of little use for Internet users. With OpenLinux 2.2, Caldera Systems makes Linux easier to install and monitor, thanks to the inclusion of several graphical utilities that guide you through the Linux experience from installation to ongoing maintenance. While these tools are important, they're not enough to hide the fact that OpenLinux doesn't offer anything different from other Linux distributions when it comes to setting up and running an Internet server.

System administrators, however, will appreciate the improved COAS (Caldera Open Administration System) and the new Lizard (LInux WiZARD), providing point-and-click installation with a graphical interface.

Basically, these tools provide graphical tools for every step of an OpenLinux installation and configuration. The PowerQuest partitioning tool is a useful way to partition a hard drive for the inclusion of a OpenLinux installation without requiring the deletion of existing operating systems. In addition, installation can be performed from an existing Microsoft Windows installation.

COAS is now integrated with the K Desktop Environment (KDE) 1.1, which makes for a consistent user interface. Basically, COAS allows for total system administration from a graphical interface, instead of requiring that some work be done from a command line and text-file editing. However, there's not support for the administration of Internet applications from COAS - for instance, you'll need to configure Apache in the same manner as before, and sendmail is still as difficult to work with as ever - and since one of the most popular uses of Linux is as an Internet server, it would have been nice to see broader support for the main Internet applications.

Other Internet-specific tools include a DHCP client, while the BRU backup and restore utility will help system administrators sleep easier at night.

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