Windows NT Server 4.0 -- Microsoft's high-end operating system with a bundled Web server Page 3

By ServerWatch Staff (Send Email)
Posted May 12, 1999


Enterprise Edition, Summary
The Enterprise Edition adds several features to the standard Server package, including clustering capabilities with TCP/IP load balancing via a service that supports up to 32 Windows NT systems in a single cluster.

At its best, Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 is a powerful platform for Web-application development and deployment. While there are some doubts about NT's ability to manage a large number of transactions -- indeed, Microsoft doesn't even deploy Windows NT on its busiest Web sites -- there is no doubt that Windows NT Server 4.0 can be a valuable tool in the corporation for running an Internet or intranet Web site. With a wide range of affordable and compatible e-commerce and development tools, Windows NT Server is always a factor when looking at operating systems for deployment on the Internet.

Pros: 7 Inclusion of Internet Information Server, 7 Tight integration with other Microsoft Internet/Web development and deployment tools, 7 Load balancing available in Enterprise Edition

Cons: 7 May not be robust enough for high-traffic situations, 7 COM preferred over CORBA, 7 Closed architecture, 7 Expensive

New in SP-5: More Year 2000 (Y2K) fixes, cluster server updates, fixed Microsoft Exchange/RAS issue and Exchange Protocols Failure issue, updated reservation management with DHCP Servers, improved updating of MTS files, integrated IE 4.01 SP2 (why not IE5?!?); Release Notes
Upgrade Meter: 4

New in SP-6: Resolved an issue with Lotus Notes and other Winsock-based applications; includes an update to the IIS 3.0 log converter utility, convlog; revised Winver.exe to allow for quick verification of whether a system is running Windows NT 4.0 SP6a; Release Notes
Upgrade Meter: 3

Licensing Changes Announced: Effective October 1, 2001, Windows NT Server 4.0, Windows NT 4.0, Enterprise Edition, and Windows NT 4.0 Client Access Licenses (CALs), will no longer be available through volume licensing programs. At this time, all version, competitive, and product upgrade licenses for Windows NT Server 4.0 and Windows NT 4.0, Enterprise Edition will no longer be available in retail. Effective July 1, 2002, Windows NT Server 4.0 (Standard and Enterprise Edition) Full Packaged Product (FPP) will no longer be available in the reselling channel, and Windows NT Server 4.0 (Standard, Enterprise Edition, Terminal Server Edition) will no longer be offered through the Direct OEM channel. Starting July 1, 2003, Windows NT Server 4.0 (Standard) will no longer be offered through the System Builder channel. More Information

Version Reviewed: 4.0 SP-5
Reviewed by: Kevin Reichard
Last Updated: 10/9/01
Date of Original Review: 5/12/99

Windows NT Security Patch Notes:

6.25.99. The "CSRSS Worker Thread Exhaustion" Vulnerability patch is a denial of service vulnerability only. It does not provide the opportunity to compromise data or obtain any additional privileges on the machine. The machines chiefly at risk are ones that allow users to interactively log onto them and either run programs or install services. The situation that creates the denial of service condition must be initiated on the target machine itself, and cannot be directly caused from a remote machine. Windows NT servers are chiefly at risk, and only if they allow normal users to interactively log onto them. Most Windows NT workstation and Windows NT Terminal Server machines are unlikely to be affected.

6.23.99. The "Malformed LSA Request" Vulnerability Patch eliminates a vulnerability that poses a denial of service threat to Windows NT servers and workstations. Without the patch, a malformed request to the Local Security Authority (LSA) service can cause the service to stop responding, requiring the computer to be restarted. All editions of Windows NT 4.0 are affected.

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