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What's the Worst that Can Happen? Page 2

By Paul Rubens (Send Email)
Posted June 18, 2015

What's the Worst that Can Happen?

In a scenario like that, what's the worst that can happen? If all 25% disappear, your Big Data number crunching will take a little longer than if none of them had. But the upside is that it will only cost you marginally more for the chance of the task being completed considerably faster. Which may, or may, not suit you.

In fact, Google's Chrome security team runs its Clusterfuzz tool to perform non-stop randomized security testing in the cloud against the latest code in Chrome running on thousands of virtual machines, according to Nash.

Having more compute power means they can find (and then fix) security bugs faster. Using Preemptible VMs, they were able to double their scale while decreasing their costs, claims Nash.

The thinking behind the service is that Google inevitably has spare, unused compute resources in its data centers that it may need to claim and put to work at any time to cope with increases in demand, server failures and a multitude of other possible reasons.

So rather than let these resources sit idle, the new service allows Google to put them to useful work for customers while still being available at zero notice if the company needs them for any other purpose.

Server virtualization is all about efficiency through increased utilization, and what this does is take it a step further: increasing cloud compute resource utilization while still maintaining the necessary free headroom.

Customers win, and Google wins. All in all an excellent way to go.

Paul Rubens is a technology journalist and contributor to ServerWatch, EnterpriseNetworkingPlanet and EnterpriseMobileToday. He has also covered technology for international newspapers and magazines including The Economist and The Financial Times since 1991.

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