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IBM Debuts Tivoli for z9 Mainframe

By Clint Boulton (Send Email)
Posted Aug 23, 2005


Acknowledging that a serious mainframe requires serious software to manage its many activities, IBM is preparing new Tivoli software for its next major mainframe, the z9. The software suite aims to help the z9 mainframe process transactions and give users a reprieve from outages.

The suite includes about a dozen workload management, monitoring and system capacity planning utilities that guide and secure both the major and minor transactions floating throughout the large zSeries computer.

The new software includes a portal to give programmers a more complete view of the computer's tasks and make it easier for IT administrators to monitor the data exchange.

Management software, a multi-billion-dollar market segment, is crucial.

Products like IBM's Tivoli line help users identify and resolve a potentially damaging issue before it becomes a problem. Sales of such software have enjoyed a boom in the last few years, fueled by the increasing complexity of computing tasks, which in turn require complex machines to complete them.

Companies like IBM with its Tivoli brand and HP, Computer Associates  and BMC have been successful selling software that helps workers track the availability and performance of transactions and applications across a business.

The new software, which will be offered as an add-on to the z9 when it becomes generally available next month, is in keeping with the push for more distributed computing systems.

IBM said in a statement that the new Tivoli software manages not just the goings-on in the mainframe itself, but the maze of servers, networks and desktops that draw jobs from the Big Iron.

IBM's attention to distributed computing is part of an industry-wide trend toward a more service-oriented  approach that leverages Web services  to exchange information and conduct business over the Internet. The company has been devoting its newest software products to the SOA push.

The new Tivoli software comes a month after IBM unveiled its new large zSeries system at an event in New York City. The machine boasts double the power, memory and capacity of its z990 ancestor, also known as the T-Rex, suggesting its ability to devour data.

The most valuable assets of the new machine are the new security features, which allow users to encrypt and transport data to customers, partners and suppliers. The new machine will use the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol to enable 6,000 secure online handshakes per second, three times as many as the z990.

Such new security utilities and assurances are crucial because the corporate world has been riddled with data leaks in which personal information was compromised.

This article was originally published on internetnews.com.

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