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Vendors Line Up Behind Oracle 10g

By Michael Singer (Send Email)
Posted Sep 10, 2003


Not surprisingly, almost immediately after Oracle unveiled its eagerly awaited 10g product suite at Fall OracleWorld earlier this week, Dell, Hewlett-Packard, Sun Microsystems, and a host of other companies were waiting in the wings to announce support and further their grid-computing efforts.

Almost immediately after Oracle unveiled its eagerly awaited 10g product suite at Fall OracleWorld earlier this week, Dell, Hewlett-Packard, Sun Microsystems, and a host of other companies were waiting in the wings to announce support and further their grid-computing efforts.

Oracle's just announced Oracle 10g, which is scheduled to ship by year end, includes two major upgrades to its databases and applications server as well as new enterprise management software to back up the vendor's push for more automated systems.

Dell

In a speech given at Fall OracleWorld, Dell CEO and Chairman Michael Dell said Oracle on his company's computers is becoming the standard in the data center more than it ever has in the past, with Oracle 9i RAC running Red Hat Linux based on Dell systems becoming a more common site.

The Round Rock, Texas-based computer maker has been slowly but surely growing its relationship spanning back to last year's "Unbreakable Linux" launch. Unlike the competition, however, Dell said his company has seen 46 percent growth in revenue based on Oracle-related contracts with a spike of 50 thousand customers in the past two years.

As testament to its relationship with Redwood Shores, Calif.-based Oracle, Dell said it would begin offering a new single source Oracle solution available through Dell.

"As opposed to traditional models where you go through different vendors to get different needs met, here you have one throat to choke," Dell said.

Dell also noted the current IT trend to switch from 8-way and above systems to more scalable clustering technologies, such as the one his company offers with Oracle.

Dell said in about 10 years, grid computing would become more mainstream for midsize businesses in a broad sense and noted his company would be at the forefront of the build up.

HP

HP for its part announced support for Oracle 10g and Oracle Application Server 10g to extend its Adaptive Enterprise portfolio.

HP and Oracle will work together to integrate Oracle 10g on HP platforms with the goal of better enabling enterprises to redefine business processes, optimize resources, and increase performance.

HP and Oracle are also jointly working with several consortia, including OASIS, W3C, Globus Labs, and the Web Service-Interoperability Organization, to further drive industry adoption of open standards for grid computing.

HP announced a number of benchmarks achieved by its Integrity and ProLiant servers running 10g. It is claiming a world-record TPC-C performance of 136,110.98 transactions per minute (tpmC) for any 4-processor system and showed exceptional value for 4-way systems with a price/performance of $4.09/tpmC. Tests were also conducted running Oracle Database 10g on an industry-standard HP Integrity rx5670 64-bit server with four Intel Itanium 2 processors running Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS 3.0. HP also claims a new record for running 10g on industry-standard HP ProLiant servers, where it achieved the fastest-ever performance and record price/performance on Linux for the SPECjAppServer2002 MultipleNode benchmark.

Sun

Sun jumped into the 10g arena Monday with its demonstration of an InfiniBand-based Oracle Database clustering stack. The combination is configured to run the Red Hat Linux operating system and Oracle Database 10g on a Sun Fire V65x server cluster. The configuration also includes Sun Fire V60x servers, Sun StorEdge 3510 Fibre Channel storage arrays, Sun Control Station, and Topspin's Switched Computing System.

Sun said it plans to incorporate InfiniBand support within select Sun Fire server products as well as within storage and software products. In March, Sun selected Topspin to provide both the Fibre Channel and Gigabit Ethernet I/O modules for Sun's next-generation InfiniBand-based volume server products.

Sun also plans to merge Trusted Solaris into regular Solaris going forward, starting with the upcoming release.

Also on tap in Sun's future is a provisioning technique based on LPARS containers that lets the mainframe act like a multibladed system. Sun CEO Scott McNealy said Sun will begin using the technology starting with the Solaris 10 release due out next year.

"Effectively, you have a system running a blade architecture to run inside big servers using multiple functions using containers," McNealy said.

Other vendors that have announced support for Oracle 10g, include AdventNet, Computer Associates International, Egenera, EMC, FNSTAR, Mellanox Technologies, Platform Computing, Quest Software, Topspin, and Tomax.

Oracle plans to work with these partners to develop integration points to reduce the management complexities of enterprise grid computing and other multivendor technology environments.

Parts of this article were previously published on siliconvalley.internet.com.

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