Avamar Launches Axion

By Wayne Kawamoto (Send Email)
Posted Oct 17, 2002


Secondary storage solutions provider Avamar Technologies this week released Axion, a scalable appliance for enterprise backup, restore, and archival. Axion relies on hard-disk storage to deliver online accessibility for all protected data, while its software is designed to reduce the amount of data stored and moved over networks by up to 99 percent compared to conventional solutions. Avamar's new data protection solution relies on hard-disk storage to deliver online accessibility for all protected data, while its software claims to reduce the amount of data stored and moved over networks by up to 99 percent.

The Axion appliance provides policy-based scheduling, organization, and authentication through a network-ready, centralized management application. With its Snapup technology, Axion aims to eliminate the need for recurring full backups, easing backup-window requirements and reducing bandwidth utilization in congested LANS and WANs.

According to Avamar, an Axion Snapup captures a point-in-time copy of a system that may be immediately restored as individual files, folders, or entire file systems. Built for scalability and reliability, Axion is designed to be expanded to handle large enterprise environments, while providing local and remote system fault tolerance.

The company says that Axion maximizes storage and network efficiency by finding small, logical sequences in files, objects, and databases and storing each logical sequence only a single time across an entire enterprise. Edited files, copied attachments, shared applications, and even daily changing databases present a small amount of new data to an Axion system.

To identify and eliminate redundancy, Axion uses a Content Addressed Storage (CAS) architecture. The storage address for any data element stored in the Axion system is generated by an analysis of the data itself, in a process that should ensure the authenticity of the data. This 'content address' can be used to refer to repeated data elements to eliminate redundancy, which is one way Axion is able to cut back on its disk storage requirements.

Axion is currently available for Solaris 2.6, 7,8; Windows NT 4.0, 2000, XP, and 98 (all with open-file support); Red Hat Linux 7.1, 7.2; and Oracle databases using Oracle RMAN. Entry price for a fully mirrored appliance is $175,000.

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