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Penguin Computing Adds to Relion Product Line

By Amy Newman (Send Email)
Posted Jan 15, 2002


Linux vendor Penguin Computing Tuesday announced three additions to its Relion server line: two 1U rackmount servers and a server class workstation. Each product contains the latest generation of Intel Pentium III processor chips.

The Relion 115 was engineered with high performance computing clustering in mind. Built around dual Intel Pentium III processors with speeds of up to 1.26 GHz (512 KB of cache) processors and up to 4 GB of PC133 RAM, Penguin believes the Relion 115 has the processing power to satisfy the needs of educational and research institutions. The Relion 115 is available with one or two ATA-100 IDE hard drives, which offer up to 200 GB of system storage.

Linux vendor Penguin Computing Tuesday announced three additions to its Relion server line: two 1U rackmount servers and a server class workstation. Each product contains the latest generation of Intel Pentium III processor chips.

The Relion 125 is described as a high-availability, ultra rack-dense general-purpose server designed to deliver new levels of performance, availability, and scalability in a space-saving 1U form factor. The Relion 125 features dual Intel Pentium III processors with speeds of up to 1.26 GHz and with up to 4GB of RAM, a pair of hot-swappable SCSI disks, and various RAID options, including attachments for external storage systems.

The Relion 405 Tower is the workstation equivalent of Penguin's Relion 405 rackmount server. It was designed to function as both a stand-alone workgroup server and a system administrator's console. Penguin claims top Intel Pentium III performance for the workstation -- up to dual 1.26GHz (512 KB of cache) processors and up to 4 GB of RAM.

Storage for the Relion 405 Tower is provided by as many as 6 SCSI hard drives with RAID options to protect vital data. Penguin sees the Relion 405 Tower as an ideal system for processor-intensive multimedia applications, as it also offers a wide variety of audio/visual peripherals.

"These new powerful Intel-based platforms, coupled with Penguin Computing's customization capabilities, raise the bar for rapid deployment of systems specifically tailored to customer's needs," said Sam Ockman, CEO of Penguin Computing.

Ockman added that he believes these products offer customers the latest technology with a solid upgrade path for their future infrastructure.

Penguin's strategy is to offer Linux hardware, software, and services that remove the complexity involved in developing and deploying fully customized solutions. Founded in 1998, the privately held company is based in San Francisco.



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