Software AG's Alf Goebel Discusses Tamino

By Amy Newman (Send Email)
Posted Oct 30, 2000


Alf Goebel, president of Software AG's U.S. subsidiary and vice president global alliances, met with ServerWatch last week to discuss the latest version of Software AG's Tamino platform.

Tamino is described as both an "information server" and a platform. Now in version 2.1, the product reflects Software AG's recognition of the growing impact of XML and represents its move to break away from the tethering proprietary standards it believes are becoming as legacy as the applications and data they result in.

Alf Goebel, president of Software AG's U.S. subsidiary and vice president global alliances, met with ServerWatch last week to discuss the latest version of Software AG's Tamino platform.

Prior to Tamino's release, Software AG was already a leader in the OLTP space with Adabas. Adabas is an HTTP database first released in 1971 that is currently used by about 3,000 companies, including Federal Express, Sprint, Philips, and North American Van Lines.

Adabas has kept pace with the times. Now in v7.1, the product has features and add-ons to handle customer needs like XML, Web-like user interfaces, improved Web access, and support of new architectures.

However, Software AG realized that that the golden days for proprietary applications were drawing to a close, according to Goebel. The company opted to leverage its experience with HTTP and put out a product that reflected where the market was going.

Thus, Tamino was born. At its core, Tamino is a native XML database. To further its appeal to users, Software AG developed middleware and various tools that wrap around it. It has also partnered with other companies to include their already-developed third-party tools. Tamino acts as an "information hub" and can store audio and video files, images, database files, e-mail, and more.

To further penetrate the market, Software AG has formed alliances with hardware vendors like IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft, and Siemens to integrate some of their features. By using what has already been developed, Software AG hopes to keep the product open. It is also working with the W3C to ensure Tamino is compatible with all open standards.

Although Tamino is the first product of this type to reach the market, its use of open standards may make it ripe for competition. Goebel believes this is not a cause for concern, as Software AG's experience with HTTP databases will give it an advantage. The middleware and developer tools will also help; as will its cross-platform compatibility (the product runs on nearly every platform, including Linux and Unix) and inherent scalability (Tamino can scale from NT up to the mainframe). And being first to market with this unique product doesn't hurt either.

Tamino is priced cafeteria-style, with a base price of $25,000 for the NT version and $125,000 for the mainframe version. Tools, middleware, and other extensions are priced separately, allowing enterprises to customize Tamino to meet their needs.


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