Listen Up, Data Center Managers!

By ServerWatch Staff (Send Email)
Posted Aug 20, 2010


Listening well is a key component of being a master communicator. CIOUpdate columnist Alan Carroll explains why it's important to open your mind to allow new ideas to filter in to your ears.


You can ask 'can you hear me now?' of your data center managers, but the real question to ask is 'are you listening?'

To become a master communicator you need to first become a master listener. One of the challenges to becoming a master listener is being fully present. By filtering what is being said through your own conceptual conditioning your IT leadership abilities will be reduced.

Why is master listening critical to the success of your organization? Because the rise and fall of organizations depends on the ability of the leader to detach (at least momentarily) from past thoughts and conditioning and give space to new ideas that could very well represent the future direction the organization needs to take in order to survive.

Now, let's explore the next step, which is learning how to detach from that conditioning and be fully present with the other person. Please remember my coaching from the first column, which was to listen from the place of possibility rather then listening from assessing, judging and comparing what I say to your database of knowledge.

When we are born we have something within us that is analogous to flash memory storage device (FMSD) or your database of knowledge. At birth, the device for the most part is empty. And then, throughout our lives, every time we experience something, learn a new idea, or gather a new fact, it is stored in our flash memory and becomes part of our identity. Psychologically speaking this FMSD can be referred to as your mind, ego, I, me or the little voice inside your head that judges and evaluates every event that occurs in your field of now.

Read the rest of "IT Leadership is Listening " at CIOUpdate.com.

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